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Privacy Policy

The Prescott Animal Park Association D.B.A. Heritage Park Zoological Sanctuary, respects the privacy of our visitors, members, and donors. The purpose of this statement is to define our policy with regard to the collection and use of personally identifiable information via our website, www.heritageparkzoo.org.

Information Collected:

This website collects two kinds of information: anonymous information and personally identifiable information.

Anonymous information does not indentify specific individuals and is automatically transmitted by your browser.  This information can consist of: the URL (Uniform Resource Locator or address) of the web page your previously visited; the domain names and/or IP addresses of the computer you are using; and your browser software and operating system.  This information is used to monitor site usage and traffic patterns of our customers in order to improve our website.  This information is always devoid of any personally identifying information.

Personally Identifiable Information could include: name, address, e-mail address, telephone number and payment information.  By sending us an email e-mail or filling out an online form, you are sending us personal information.  We store this information in order to respond to or process your request.  We may use your information to send you futher information about our organization.  You may always opt-out of future mailings.

If you are purchasing a membership, making a donation, signing up for a fee-based event or program, or making a similar financial transaction through www.heritageparkzoo.org, we need to know your name, e-mail address, billing and shipping address, and payment information in order to process and fulfill your order.  All personal informatio we receive is kept secure.

Sharing Information:

Personal information obtained through the website will not be sold or given to third parties for marketing purposes.

Links:

Our website contains to websites maintained by other oarganizations.  Once you access an individual document on another website, you are subject to the provacy policy of the website containing that document.

Use of Text and Images:

Anyone wishing to publish information found on our website must send a request to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. .

On Zoo Grounds and Commercial Photography:

Heritage Park Zoological Sanctuary reserves the right to photograph, videotape, or film our visitors, on Sanctuary grounds, for promotional purposes.  The commerical use of photographs, video, and film taken during your visit is strictly prohibited without the written consent of Heritage Park Zoological Sanctuary.

Contact Us:

If you have any questions regarding the website or this policy, please contact This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Invertebrates

Tarantulas

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  • There are over 800 tarantula species worldwide. They are found on every continent except Antarctica. The tarantulas at the sanctuary come from South, Central, and North America, as well as from Africa and Asia.
  • Tarantulas are either terrestrial (ground dwellers) or arboreal (tree dwellers).
  • Female tarantulas can live up to 30 years. Males are shorter lived, and often eaten by the female after mating.
  • In Arizona, we’re lucky to live with tarantulas in the wild. They eat bugs and even rodents that you wouldn't want in your house. If you find one in or near your home, carefully scoop it into a cup or bowl and re-locate it. Or, just leave it alone.
  • HPZS's collection is one of the largest public displays in the country. We have  9 species of tarantula.

Each year, HPZS gets calls from countless, well-meaning individuals who catch these small animals in or near their homes. We ask people to leave them where they are found. Due to their unique ecology, removing them from their home range can result in death.

Emperor Scorpion

( Pandinus imperator )

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  • This species is the largest in North America, but found only in California and Arizona. Once in a while it can be found at the edges of southern Utah and Nevada. It can grow to six inches in length.
  • This species feeds on other invertebrates and occasionally on small reptiles. It has a bulb full of venom (bottom picture) and will inject it into prey or its predators.
  • As with many venomous animals, larger does not necessarily mean more dangerous. The giant desert hairy scorpion's venom is considered mild, by comparison to other scorpions. Except when an allergic reaction occurs, a sting from this species is not typically lethal. However, it is still very painful.
  • Unlike cockroaches, scorpions are not insects. They are actually classified as arachnids, along with tarantulas and other spiders, mites, and ticks.
  • Each year, HPZS gets calls from countless, well-meaning individuals who catch these small animals in or near their homes. We ask people to leave them where they are found. Due to their unique ecology, removing them from their home range can result in death.

Madagascar Hissing Cockroaches

(Gromphadorhina portentosa)

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  • Not everyone's best friend, but they were here before us.
  • Cockroaches are known to have resided on earth over 250 million years ago, and looked very much the same as they do today. There are over 3,500 species today. Most are omnivorous, meaning they eat plants and meat. They are very adaptable and have even been found to be able to withstand up to 105,000 rems of radiation (a thermonuclear explosion). Humans will die if exposed to just 800 rems.
  • Unlike other insects that produce sounds by rubbing body parts together, the hissing cockroach has the unique ability of producing a sound by forcing air through spiracles, a component of their respiratory system. It is a true hiss.

Sign-Up for Our Newsletter!

Are you interested in learning about new animals as they arrive and special events that we hold here at the park? If so, then sign-up for our free monthly e-newsletter! Each month, you'll receive an email detailing all of the latest happenings here at the Sanctuary. Most of the time, you're getting information like this before we share it with anyone else! Simply enter your email address below and we'll add you to the list. And if you're not happy with what you're getting, you can unsubscribe anytime.

Mexican Gray Wolf SSP Website:

Gray Wolf

Heritage Park Zoological Sanctuary currently houses two incredibly rare Mexican Gray Wolves. This species is dwindling in the wild, but thanks to the Species Survival Plan (SSP), captive breeding programs and reintroductions into the wild have helped turn the tables. Please visit our partner website (by clicking on the photo) for more information on this amazing animal and what you can do to help!